QOF cash worth £10,000 moved to core pay in Scottish GP contract deal

GP leaders in Scotland have struck a deal that will transfer around £10,000 in QOF funding per average practice into core pay while practices in the rest of the UK face extra work to earn the money.

Dr Alan McDevitt: GP contract deal for Scotland
Dr Alan McDevitt: GP contract deal for Scotland

GPC Scotland chairman Dr Alan McDevitt told GP that funding for 77 points - half of the organisational indicators the UK government plans to cut from the QOF - will be added to core pay in Scotland. This is worth around £10,000 per average practice.

Contract changes the UK government is threatening to impose would see MPIG top-ups to core GMS funding phased out over seven years starting from 2014. But the Scottish government has agreed simply to explore the scope to reduce variability in funding, and will not press ahead with such a move unilaterally.

The Scottish government has also agreed that some of the QOF indicators proposed by NICE, which the UK government plans to impose, will not be implemented in Scotland in 2013/14. In addition, changes to QOF thresholds that look likely to go ahead in England, could mean practices have to treat as many as 97% of patients to target to achieve maximum QOF points in some domains. In Scotland, 13 threshold rises have been agreed, but no top threshold will exceed 90%.

Under the deal proposed by the UK government, the vast majority of funding for organisational indicators will be diverted to pay for new enhanced services and new QOF indicators. Practices will still be expected to deliver the work involved in the organisational indicators, but would have to carry out this extra work to retain the funding.

Dr McDevitt said: '77 organisational points are going into core funding, with no effect on correction factor or the money practices pay to opt out of out of hours.

'The amount transferred to each practice will be the average of each practices' achievement in the last three years.'

A BMA Scotland spokeswoman said: 'In England the intention is to move that resource into enhanced services. It is not guaranteed to go into general practice. Moving it into core funding in Scotland provides financial stability. Some of the other funding will go to priorities identified by the Scottish government.'

She said this would include targets looking at 'anticipatory, preventive care', with practices expected to take steps to identify people at high risk of hospital admissions.

Full details of how these extra targets will work are expected imminently.

77 points going into core funding, with no effect on correction factor or opt out for out of hours

 

Amount transferred to each prac will be avg of each practices achievement in the last three years.

 

gail

We tend to negotiate enhanced services separately.

 

In eng intention to move that resource into enhanced services. Not guaranteed to go into general practice. Moving it into core funding in scot provides financial stability. Some of the other funding will go to priorities identified by Scot govt. Anticipatory, preventive care will – how to identify people at high risk of hosp admissions

 

Steps practices can take.

 

Clear indicators for that to come imminently.

 

We don’t yet know what the imposition will look like in the rest of the UK. It does recognise some of the issues we have with managing workload in general practice.

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