PCTs fail to tackle alcohol harm

PCTs are not meeting their responsibility to tackle alcohol harm, according to the Committee of Public Accounts.

By Joanne Ellul

Nearly a third of men and a fifth of women in England are regularly drinking more than official guideline limits, the committee revealed in its report on reducing alcohol harm.

However, many PCTs have neither drawn up strategies to tackle alcohol harm in their areas nor know how much they are spending on alcohol services, Edward Leigh, Conservative MP for Gainsborough in Lincolnshire and chairman of the committee, said.

Each PCT should show the progress it has made towards reducing the number of alcohol-related hospital admissions in its area, Mr Leigh said. In 2006/07, there were some 811,000 alcohol-related hospital admissions, representing a 71% increase since 2002/03.

Mr Leigh also said the DoH needs to examine all departments, initiatives and policies bearing on alcohol misuse and should communicate its concerns about those who are hindering reducing levels of alcohol harm to senior officials.

Dr Peter Carter, chief executive of the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), said: ‘The RCN is calling for the introduction of a single mandatory code to ensure that the alcohol industry does not engage in unscrupulous practices which encourage consumers to drink to excess. Better regulation of the labelling, sale and advertising of alcoholic drinks, as well as widespread education on the dangers of excessive alcohol consumption, is needed to stop this problem from spiralling even further out of control.

‘Nurses have said time and time again that the government must take drastic action to stop this dire situation spiralling out of control.'

medical.temp@haymarket.com


More news from 30 July

GPC denies seeking £700m for swine flu vaccination programme
NICE examines stroke, dementia and VTE
'Suspend European Working Time Directive' for swine flu call
RCN fellow condemns its assisted suicide stance

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus