Pain patch cleared for use in NHS Scotland

A patch-based treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain can now be used for patients in NHS Scotland, after assessment by the Scottish Medicines Consortium.

Patches are applied directly onto the skin and release a pain killer called capsaicin, the active component of chilli peppers (Photograph: SPL)
Patches are applied directly onto the skin and release a pain killer called capsaicin, the active component of chilli peppers (Photograph: SPL)

Patients can now receive capsaicin (Qutenza) patches to treat peripheral neuropathic pain in adults without diabetes, either alone or in combination with other medicinal products for pain. The patches are applied directly onto the skin and release a pain killer called capsaicin, the active component of chilli peppers.

Treatment is restricted to adults with post-herpetic neuralgia who have not achieved adequate pain relief from, or who have not tolerated, conventional first- and second-line treatments. The SMC said it accepted capsaicin (Qutenza) patches because it provides an alternative treatment method for some patients when other treatments have not provided pain relief, at an acceptable cost.

The SMC added that treatment should be under the supervision of a specialist in pain management. Pain and redness of the skin at the site of application are common side-effects.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus