Letters: Sensible use of PSA test has life-prolonging role

I was sorry to see the same tired argument against the PSA test trotted out (GP, 23 October).

Any fool can tell you that a raised PSA in an 80-year-old is relatively meaningless. To interpret a PSA, you need to know the patient's age and, ultimately, their Gleason score. The younger patient who requests a PSA should be taken seriously, especially if there is cancer in the family history. Many lives could be prolonged by its sensible use.

Dr John Nichols, Guildford, Surrey

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