High-fat diets found to reduce skin cancer risk

Eating a high-fat diet might reduce risk of developing skin cancer, Australian researchers claim.

The findings conflict with previous studies which suggested that high-fat diets might contribute to an increased risk.

The study included 652 skin cancer patients aged 20-59 of northern European ancestry living in Tasmania, and 471 controls.

All participants completed a questionnaire on their intake of dietary fat, as well as information on sun exposure since childhood.

The researchers compared the impact of a low, medium and high intake of dietary fat on the risk of having skin cancer.

After adjusting for age, sex and sun exposure, they found that those with the highest dietary fat intake were the least likely to have skin cancer.

They had a 48 per cent decreased risk compared to those in the lowest fat intake group. Those with a medium dietary fat intake were 24 per cent less likely to have skin cancer than those with the lowest fat intake.

Follow-up data on rates of new non-melanoma skin cancer over four years after the initial study provided further support for a link.

Lead researcher Dr Rob Granger, from the Menzies Research Institute in Hobart, Tasmania, said that the findings were not what they expected.

'We thought that low levels of dietary fat would be associated with a reduced risk of a first non-melanoma skin cancer,' he said.

However, he did not recommend high-fat diets in order to reduce skin cancer risk.

'Skin cancers are eminently treatable, and apart from melanoma, are typically not dangerous in their early stages,' he said.

'We could not recommend consuming a higher level of fat simply to achieve a minimal reduction in risk of skin cancer while considerably enhancing risk of other cancers, diabetes and heart disease.'

- BioMed Central - Live links at GPonline.com.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Follow Us:

Just published

Three people stabbed at East London GP practice

Three people stabbed at East London GP practice

Three people were stabbed at a GP practice in East London on Wednesday morning, police...

Practices face £50,000 pension cost hike under plan to raise employer contribution to 20.6%

Practices face £50,000 pension cost hike under plan to raise employer contribution to 20.6%

GP practices could face a five-figure hike in pension costs under plans to increase...

What medico-legal challenges will GPs face in 2019?

What medico-legal challenges will GPs face in 2019?

The MDU's head of advisory services, Dr Caroline Fryar, predicts which medico-legal...

GP practices providing online consultations doubled in 12 months, survey suggests

GP practices providing online consultations doubled in 12 months, survey suggests

The proportion of GP practices in England providing online consultations has almost...

Dr Nikita Kanani: Why peer support is the key to building a stronger general practice

Dr Nikita Kanani: Why peer support is the key to building a stronger general practice

NHS England's acting director of primary care Dr Nikita Kanani says connecting with...

Next-day GP appointments three times as likely to be missed as same-day bookings

Next-day GP appointments three times as likely to be missed as same-day bookings

Patients are nearly three times as likely to miss appointments booked with GP practices...