GP shortage leaves rising number of Scottish practices run by health boards

A GP practice in Tayside is set to become the latest to be run directly by a Scottish health board after partners quit and were unable to recruit anyone to replace them.

GP practice: rising number taken over by Scottish health boards (Photo: Geoff Franklin)
GP practice: rising number taken over by Scottish health boards (Photo: Geoff Franklin)

Figures released by a political party suggest around 42 practices - around one in 25 of all Scottish practices - are already run by health boards.

Current partners at the Brechin Medical Centre in Tayside are dissolving their partnership, and have been forced to ask the area's health board to take over the service.

NHS Tayside plans to recruit a team of salaried GPs to run the practice, but admitted the partners had struggled to recruit 'due to a national GP shortage'. The health board will take over the practice from 1 October.

Dr Michelle Watts, primary care services associate medical director for NHS Tayside, said: 'Work is already underway to recruit a team of salaried GPs for Brechin who will be employed by NHS Tayside and will work with the existing team from the Brechin premises.

GP services

'We aim to continue to deliver a range of healthcare services from the practice and we will do our very best to ensure continuity of care for all patients.

'Patients will remain registered with Brechin Medical Practice after 1 October 2015 and there is no need for them to take any further action. Patients will continue to access GP and primary care services at the practice as they do now.'

Practice manager Fiona Robertson said: 'We recently introduced a new appointment system to help patients access our services whilst we undergo this period of change.

'The system is working well and has reduced the number of appointments wasted due to patients not attending.'

Dr Watts added: 'We will also take the opportunity to look at new ways of delivering care to the locality including the development of named multi-professional teams working in the community to support people with health needs.

'This community-based model of care for elderly patients involves a variety of health professionals including consultants, pharmacists, physiotherapists and nurses working together as a single team in partnership with social care and voluntary sector colleagues to support individual patients.'

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Follow Us:

Just published

Recognising and referring domestic violence and abuse

Recognising and referring domestic violence and abuse

A social enterprise is helping to train staff in GP practices to support women affected...

GPs 'in the dark' over pension tax trap support for this year

GPs 'in the dark' over pension tax trap support for this year

GPs remain in the dark over how a stop-gap offer from NHS England to pay off pension...

Network DES will cost GPs money and threaten independent contractor status, warn LMCs

Network DES will cost GPs money and threaten independent contractor status, warn LMCs

A group of LMCs has warned it 'cannot recommend' GPs sign up to revised plans for...

'A Hard Day's Night': a GP's musical reaction to the updated contract

'A Hard Day's Night': a GP's musical reaction to the updated contract

The life of a GP can be incredibly busy, but that hasn't stopped one talented doctor...

Viewpoint: Revamped 2020 contract 'a watershed moment for general practice'

Viewpoint: Revamped 2020 contract 'a watershed moment for general practice'

Following weeks of uncertainty over the future of primary care networks (PCNs), reworked...

BMA could ask for QOF suspension if coronavirus cases rise

BMA could ask for QOF suspension if coronavirus cases rise

Doctors’ leaders could push to suspend parts of the GP contract including the QOF...