Brake reaction to changes in speed camera rules

On Monday (April 1), long-awaited changes to the way in which speed cameras can be sited and an end to the current system of self-funding cameras through fines will come into force across the UK.

Brake, the national road safety charity, is an ardent supporter of life-saving speed cameras and is delighted that the rules on speed camera placement will be relaxed, particularly the rule stating that at least four people have to be killed or seriously injured on a specific stretch of road over a period of three years before a fixed camera can be installed.  The new rules mean a greater range of crashes can be considered over a five year period, giving a more accurate picture of risk.

 

From Monday, all revenue raised by cameras will be centrally controlled and local authorities will receive money for a range of road safety measures, including cameras and road engineering, from an annual fund of £110m.

 

Brake is calling for increased Government investment in road safety including enforcement technology such as speed cameras, more dedicated traffic police, and road safety education. 

 

Every death on the road costs society £1.4m [1].

 

A 2004 Government report shows that speed cameras in the UK are reducing deaths and serious injuries by more than 40% at camera sites and speed is a contributory factor in a third of all fatal crashes [2].

 

The new Department for Transport guidance on deployment, visibility and signing of speed and red-light cameras for traffic enforcement (Click here for the full report) states: "Safety cameras provide a valuable and cost-effective method of preventing, detecting and enforcing speed and traffic light offences.  They encourage changed driver behaviour and are also proven to make a significant contribution to improving road safety for all."

 

Jools Townsend, head of education at Brake, says: "We are delighted that the archaic rule where local communities had to wait for death or injury before their roads could be made safer has been ditched.  Speed cameras are a proven and effective enforcement tool, deterring drivers from breaking an important safety law and rightly leading to their punishment if they do drive too fast and risk lives."

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