Thermal test for arthritis

Using a new thermal imaging technique to measure fluctuations in temperature of inflamed joints could be a more reliable measure of arthritis severity than typical scoring systems based on blood tests, according to US researchers. The technique was able to detect variations in a rat ankle bone, indicating that it could also be used in small human joints (Ann Rheum Dis 2006; 65: 306-11). Pictured is a thermogram of a normal (right) and arthritic (left) knee, showing a difference of 5 degC.

Using a new thermal imaging technique to measure fluctuations in temperature of inflamed joints could be a more reliable measure of arthritis severity than typical scoring systems based on blood tests, according to US researchers. The technique was able to detect variations in a rat ankle bone, indicating that it could also be used in small human joints (Ann Rheum Dis 2006; 65: 306-11). Pictured is a thermogram of a normal (right) and arthritic (left) knee, showing a difference of 5 degC.

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