Study links cheap statin use with poor outcomes

Practices using a high proportion of cheap statins tend to have poorer clinical outcomes, a study of practices in Somerset suggests.

Research shows that low-cost statins have lower achievement (Photograph: SPL)
Research shows that low-cost statins have lower achievement (Photograph: SPL)

The research, published in the British Journal of General Practice, examined the level of low-cost statin prescribing and achievement on QOF indicators of cholesterol (CHD8) and stroke (Stroke8).

The study, conducted by Somerset GP Dr James Hickman, found a correlation between a higher proportion of low-cost statin prescribing and lower achievement. Dr Hickman believes that this raises questions about the value of using low-cost statins.

‘The results raise the concern that the pressure to prescribe low-cost statins may contribute to poorer control of cholesterol at the practice population level,' he said.

Dr Hickman also suggests that practices achieving good outcomes with high use of low-cost statins may be making use of additional therapies such as ezetimibe. Although in line with NICE guidance, this may counteract savings, he pointed out.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus