RCGP Curriculum - 8 Care of Children and Young People

This section of our curriculum guide refers to statement 8, Care of Children and Young People, produced by the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP).

Photograph: Alamy
Photograph: Alamy

GPs have an important role in the care of children and young people. Most care for children and young people is delivered outside the hospital setting, and there is good evidence that providing care in primary care delivers improved outcomes in the health of children and young people.

The experiences of children and young people in early life – and even before birth – have a crucial impact on their life chances. Promoting health in children and young people can be included in all contacts with a child, a young person and their family, and should be targeted particularly at the vulnerable and socially excluded.

Here we have collated key articles from our journals to help you meet the curriculum requirements in this area.

In this section you will find articles on:

Primary care management

Skills and attitudes

Symptoms

Neonatal problems

Infections

Developmental problems

Other conditions

Prevention

Other related articles

 

Primary Care Management

Abuse

Prescribing for children

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Skills and Attitudes

Consulting with adolescents

Postnatal depression

Concerns about failure to thrive

Promoting immunisation

Awareness of eating disorders

Sexual health needs in minors/prescribing the Pill for under 16s

GP’s role in enuresis, sleep disturbance, school avoidance, bullying

Confidentiality and consent

Examination of the newborn child

The six-week developmental check

Basic life support of infants, children and young people

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Symptoms

Behavioural problems in children
Developmental delay
Drowsiness in children
Failure to thrive & growth disorders
Fever in children
Infantile colic
Vomiting in children

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Neonatal Problems

Birthmarks

Feeding problems

Heart murmurs in children

Jaundice in neonates

Sticky eye

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Infections

Gastroenteritis in children

Meningitis in children

Urinary tract infections in children

Otitis media in children

Viral exanthems in children

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Developmental Problems

Child and young person development

Sensory deficit including deafness

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Other conditions

Abdominal pain in children (acute and chronic)

Child abuse and deprivation

Mental health problems in childhood

 

Psychological problems in childhood

Constipation in children

Cough and dyspnoea in children

Epilepsy in children

Pyrexia and febrile convulsions

Wheezing in children

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Prevention

Avoiding smoking, avoiding the use of volatile substances and other drugs, and minimising alcohol intake
Breastfeeding
Healthy diet and exercise for children
Immunisation in childhood
Keeping children and young people safe, including child protection, accident prevention.
Prenatal diagnosis
Reducing the risk of teenagers getting pregnant or acquiring sexually transmitted infections

Social and emotional wellbeing in childhood

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Other related articles

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These curriculum resources are regularly updated with relevant articles from our range of healthcare publications. All articles are reviewed by GP advisers. We have set the standard lifetime of an article at two years and will aim to renew all articles within that timeframe. However, some older articles will remain in the listing if our reviewers believe there to be no significant changes to the topic covered.

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