RCGP Curriculum - 15.5 Eye Problems

This section of our curriculum guide refers to statement 15.5, Eye Problems, produced by the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP).

Photograph: Michael Craig/UNP
Photograph: Michael Craig/UNP

Eye problems are common – around two million people in the UK have a sight problem. Eye problems account for 1.5 per cent of general practice consultations in the UK, with a rate of 50 consultations per 1,000 population per year. Eye problems are significant causes of preventable disabilities. The GP has a key role as part of the primary healthcare team in the prevention and treatment of eye problems.

Here we have collated key articles from our journals to help you meet the curriculum requirements in this area.

In this section you will find articles on:

Symptoms

Disorders of the lids and lacrimal damage

External eye disease

Disorders of refraction

Disorders aqueous drainage

Vitreo disorders

Disorders of the optic disc and visual pathway

Eye movement disorders

Investigations

Treatment

Emergency care

Prevention

Other related articles

 

Symptoms

 
Sticky or itchy eyes
Sudden loss of vision
The painful eye
The red eye

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Disorders of the lids and lacrimal damage

 


Blepharitis
Entropion and ectropion
Naso-lacrimal obstruction and dacryocystitis
Stye and chalazion

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External eye disease

 
Corneal ulcers and keratitis
Dry eye syndrome
Episcleritis and scleritis
Iritis and uveitis
Orbital cellulites

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Disorders of refraction

Cataract

Myopia, hypermetropia, astigmatism

Principles of refractive surgery

Problems associated with contact lenses

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Disorders of aqueous drainage

Angle closure glaucoma; Primary open angle glaucoma; Secondary glaucomas

Vitreo-retinal disorders

Macular degeneration
Retinal detachment
Retinoblastoma
Vitreous detachment
Vitreous haemorrhage

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Disorders of the optic disc and visual pathway

Migraine (vision)
Pathological cupping of the optic disc
Swollen optic disc: recognition and differential diagnosis
Transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) (vision)

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Eye movement disorders


Non-paralytic and paralytic strabismus

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Investigations

Examination of the eye assessing both structure and function
Appropriate investigations to exclude systemic disease, eg erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test for temporal arteritis

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Treatment

Use of eye medications

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Emergency care

Acute angle closure glaucoma
Arc eye
Penetrating ocular injury and tissue prolapse
Retained intra-ocular foreign body
Severe blunt injury, including hyphaema
Severe intra-ocular infection
Severe orbital injury, including blow-out fracture
Sudden painless loss of vision
Superficial ocular trauma Including assessment of foreign bodies, abrasions and minor lid lacerations

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Prevention

Genetics – family history

Other related articles

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These curriculum resources are regularly updated with relevant articles from our range of healthcare publications. All articles are reviewed by GP advisers. We have set the standard lifetime of an article at two years and will aim to renew all articles within that timeframe. However, some older articles will remain in the listing if our reviewers believe there to be no significant changes to the topic covered.

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