Prostate cancer deaths fall by a fifth in 20 years

Deaths from prostate cancer have fallen by 20% since the early 1990s due to improvements in early diagnosis and treatment, figures show.

New treatments have helped cut deaths from prostate cancer. Pictured are dividing prostate cancer cells (Photo: SPL)
New treatments have helped cut deaths from prostate cancer. Pictured are dividing prostate cancer cells (Photo: SPL)

Fatal prostate cancer cases fell from 30 per 100,000 men to 24 per 100,000 over the past two decades, according to Cancer Research UK.

It means around 1,300 fewer men are dying of the disease each year.

The trend is thought to be down to earlier detection linked to use of the PSA test, coupled with more widespread use of treatments such as hormone therapy and radiotherapy.

Professor Malcolm Mason, Cancer Research UK’s prostate cancer expert based at Cardiff University, said: 'This new report shows we’ve come a long way in improving the treatment of prostate cancer in the last couple of decades. And improvements in how we treat prostate cancer have been key to reducing deaths from the disease.'

He added: 'But a lot more work still needs to be done.'

Around 41,000 men each year are diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus