Paracetamol is not linked to asthma risk

Use of paracetamol does not increase risk of childhood asthma, research has shown.

Australian researchers found no association between early paracetamol use and risk of allergic disease in children with a family history for the condition.

Evidence had suggested exposure to paracetamol in early life could cause asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis in some children.

To examine this risk, researchers assessed 620 children whose paracetamol use was tracked from birth to two years of age. They were then followed up at seven years.

Paracetamol was used in 51% of children by 12 weeks, and 97% by two years.

At age seven, 148 children had developed asthma. After adjusting for frequency of respiratory infections, researchers found there was no link between paracetamol use and the children’s asthma.

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