Nurses win awards to develop community projects

A health protection nurse practitioner and a lead public health community nurse were amongst the winners of the RCN's Mary Seacole Award winners.

Front left to right: Stephanie Allen, Pamela Shaw, Sandra Anto-Awuakye, Ofrah Muflahi, and Gloria Urhoma (back row)
Front left to right: Stephanie Allen, Pamela Shaw, Sandra Anto-Awuakye, Ofrah Muflahi, and Gloria Urhoma (back row)

The winners were announced by health minister Ann Keen.

Development awards are worth up to £6,250 each for the nurses, midwives and health visitors to undertake a project that benefits the health needs of people from black and minority ethnic communities.

Leadership awards are worth up to £12,500 each and enable nurses, midwives and health visitors in leadership positions to undertake a project to improve patient care.

The awards were created in honour of the nurse Mary Seacole, who made a significant contribution to nursing in the 19th century. They are funded jointly by the DoH and NHS Employers.

The winners were:

Leadership Awards

  • Concilia Ajuo, sister, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, north London, to help seeking behaviours of black Africans and black Caribbeans to diagnose HIV/AIDS
  • Titilayo Babatunde, lead public health community nurse, Greenwich Community Health Services, south-east London, for improving the outcome of postnatal care for women who have experienced significant life trauma before child birth.

Development Awards

  • Marion Fallon, health protection nurse practitioner, Cheshire and Merseyside health protection unit, for hepatitis B in the Chinese population in Liverpool: ideas, beliefs and expectations about preventive services;
  • Gillian Francis, health inclusion worker for travellers and gipsies, City and Hackney Community Health Services, for developing the cultural competence of health professionals working with the gypsy traveller community;
  • Sonia Clarke-Swaby, recipient transplant co-ordinator, King's College Hospital, London, for exploring the understanding and cultural beliefs surrounding organ donation amongst BME populations.

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