NICE says QOF targets for BP should be lowered

QOF targets for BP should be reduced to 140/90 for people under 80 years old for 2013/14, but kept at 150/90 for those aged 80 and over, NICE says.

NICE’s QOF advisory committee recommended that the current BP5 indicator should be retired and replaced by two new indicators. The change would bring the QOF criteria into line with NICE’s clinical guideline on hypertension (CG127).

One indicator would reward practices on the basis of 'the percentage of patients under 80 years old with hypertension in whom the last recorded BPs (measured in the preceding nine months) is 140/90 or less'.

The other indicator would reward practices on the basis of 'the percentage of patients 80 years and over with hypertension in whom the last recorded BPs (measured in the preceding nine months) is 150/90 or less'.

The proposed indicators will be put forward for the GPC and NHS Employers to negotiate whether they should be included in the 2013/14 QOF.

The QOF advisory committee also recommended that the 2013/14 QOF should include a set of indicators for RA patients. These include a register of RA patients, as well as records of annual review, as well as CVD and fracture risk assessment.

The committee also proposed including annual health checks for dementia carers and ambulatory BP monitoring for hypertension diagnosis for the 2014/15 QOF.

However, plans for practices to screen every patient who visits A&E with a minor injury for alcohol abuse have been blocked by NICE GP experts worried by the impact on workload.

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