Former government advisor urges CCGs to ally with health and wellbeing boards

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) should form alliances with the health and wellbeing boards to give them a strong voice against the demands of the National Commissioning Board, a former government advisor has said.

Mr Corrigan: 'If you want to do something radical but still get through the hoops of authorisation your biggest mates are your patients the public and local authorities.’
Mr Corrigan: 'If you want to do something radical but still get through the hoops of authorisation your biggest mates are your patients the public and local authorities.’

Speaking at the National Association of Primary Care annual conference in Birmingham on Wednesday, Paul Corrigan, who advised Tony Blair, said the health reforms will see a ‘stronger centre’ as well as ‘stronger localities’.

He said CCGs must work with local authorities as this will allow them to stand up against the NHS Commissioning Board (NCB).

He said: ‘I’m suggesting that it's not just important to have good relationships with your locality and local government because of the good work that needs to be done for your patients.

‘But actually it’s the good work that needs to be done to strengthen the locality of the CCG, against the strength of national instructions.’

He said building relationships with local authorities will also be important during the authortisation process.

He said: ‘Authorisation is something your local authority and health and wellbeing board will help you with. They want something that works in your locality. They want something that will change healthcare in your locality and if you work out something with them then Whitehall cannot disagree.’

Former DoH advisor Dr David Colin-Thome said he agreed that CCGs should form strong links with local authorities.

He said: ‘If you want to do something radical but still get through the hoops of authorisation your biggest mates are your patients the public and local authorities. Think differently about your mates.’

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