Exercise booklets can cut dizziness and are cost-effective

Literature-based training can help prevent dizziness and is a cost-effective means of improving outcomes in primary care, researchers have found.

Five patients would need to be given booklets for one patient to report a subjective improvement in function at one year.
Five patients would need to be given booklets for one patient to report a subjective improvement in function at one year.

A team from Southampton University studied 337 patients with chronic dizziness that was not attributable to non-vestibular causes and could be aggravated by head movement.

Patients were given either standard care or a booklet setting out vestibular rehabilitation exercises. Some patients given booklets also received telephone support.

After a year, patients given exercise booklets showed significant improvements in symptoms, whether or not they received telephone support.

The researchers estimate that five patients would need to be given booklets for one patient to report a subjective improvement in function at one year.

BMJ 2012; 344:e2237

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