Community treatment orders 'do little to help'

Community treatment orders (CTOs) do little to reduce arrests, hospital readmission rates or bed days in patients with mental illness, research has shown.

But the government is still pushing ahead with its plans to include CTOs - or supervised community treatment - in the Mental Health Bill despite the fears of mental health organisations that this move could affect patients' human rights.

Amendments to the bill an-nounced this month mean CTOs can only be put in place to ensure a patient receives treatment to prevent risk of harm to themselves or to protect others.

However, results of a review and meta-analysis presented at the Royal College of Psychiatrists' annual meeting in Edinburgh this week showed limited evidence that CTOs worked.

Only two randomised controlled trials were identified and neither showed any significant fall in readmission rates, bed days or arrests from CTOs compared with controls.

Dr Stephen Kisely, from Dal-housie University in Canada, told the conference it would take 500 CTOs to prevent one arrest, 100 to prevent one readmission, and 25 to prevent one episode of homelessness.

 

Royal College of Psychiatrists’ annual meeting

rachel.liddle@haymarket.com

What do you think? Comment below or email healthcare.republic@haymarket.com  

 

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register

Already registered?

Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus
Follow Us: